Kamehameha Schools needs to pay closer attention to what is good for Hawaiians

 

 

> > Aloha!

> >

> > PLEASE FORWARD FAR AND WIDE to ensure people have

> > access to this important

> > mana`o. The Kamehameha Schools newsletter "Imua"

> > refuses to print this

> > op-ed by one of their alums. It is especially

> > important that KS graduates

> > see this article.

> >

> >

> >

> --------------------------------------------------------------

> > The Trouble with Kamehameha's Support of Federal

> > Recognition

> > by Randall Kekoa Quinones Akee

> >

> >

> > A recent Kamehameha Schools CEO alert dated Feb 3,

> > 2004 by Dee Jay Mailer

> > states that Kamehameha Schools fully supports

> > federal recognition efforts

> > for Native Hawaiians. This effort, undertaken by

> > Hawai`i's Congressional

> > delegation, governor, state agencies, and a small

> > number of

> > federally-funded non-profit agencies, has done

> > little to foster input and

> > dialogue with the average Native Hawaiian. Indeed,

> > the process as of late

> > has been primarily state-driven, with OHA, DHHL, and

> > the governor taking

> > the lead in these lobbying efforts. When has the

> > will of the Hawaiian

> > people, let alone the will of ke ali`i Pauahi, ever

> > been well-represented

> > by the State of Hawai`i?

> >

> > It is important to note that federal recognition

> > will not safeguard any of

> > Kamehameha School's assets, nor will federal

> > recognition ensure the

> > continuance of the institution or end the potential

> > for other legal

> > challenges. Federal recognition deals with the

> > political status of Native

> > Hawaiians as a whole in relation to the federal

> > government of the United

> > States; this legislation does nothing to solidify or

> > establish a

> > relationship between private Native Hawaiian trusts

> > or any other

> > privately-held Native Hawaiian organizations.

> >

> > Particularly disturbing is the fact that Kamehameha

> > Schools, as a trust in

> > perpetuity, is not taking the long-run view of this

> > situation. Endorsing

> > federal recognition, as the Akaka bill now stands,

> > is clearly taking the

> > short-run perspective on Native Hawaiian

> > self-government. The bill

> > neither guarantees a permanent revenue stream or

> > resource base for a

> > Native Hawaiian governing entity, nor does it

> > establish explicit

> > protection of Native Hawaiian rights.

> >

> > The current legislation really seeks to protect two

> > state agencies and

> > their public trust assets. While this is an

> > important effort, the

> > question still remains: what long-run benefits and

> > opportunities are we

> > giving up in exchange? The reality is we don't

> > know. We haven't

> > discussed the alternatives thoroughly enough to

> > really get a sense of what

> > could be or what is desired by the Native Hawaiian

> > community. Instead,

> > Native Hawaiians and other state residents have been

> > told that federal

> > recognition is the ultimate solution to the problems

> > for Native Hawaiian

> > programs, services, and funding. As a leading

> > Hawai`i educational

> > institution, Kamehameha Schools could have taken the

> > lead in fostering

> > community input and voice; instead, like the other

> > institutions that are

> > behind federal recognition, they have sought to

> > endorse the Akaka Bill

> > with no justification or sharing of their research

> > and analysis of the

> > bill. Why would a private, non-profit trust

> > undertake such an obvious

> > political stance on such a poorly-formed piece of

> > legislation?

> >

> > The short-sighted view taken by Kamehameha Schools

> > really stems from a

> > misunderstanding about the funding of Native

> > Hawaiian programs. The CEO

> > alert cites the fact that federal recognition will

> > serve to secure

> > services and programs for Native Hawaiians.

> > Unfortunately, this is not

> > exactly true. An important distinction must be made

> > between Native

> > Hawaiian entitlements and Native Hawaiian

> > appropriations. Most, if not

> > all, of the federal programs and legislation

> > established for Native

> > Hawaiians are simply appropriations. This means

> > that funding occurs at

> > the will of Congress. An entitlement, on the other

> > hand, refers to

> > funding or programs that are immune to Congressional

> > dictates -- a good

> > example of this is Social Security. Individuals who

> > have participated in

> > the Social Security system are automatically

> > entitled to receive their

> > Social Security payments once they reach eligibility

> > age. This program

> > funding does not fluctuate according to political

> > power plays or

> > Congressional appropriations. Most Native Hawaiian

> > programs do not enjoy

> > this luxury. Hence, without a solid funding

> > guarantee or resource base, a

> > Native Hawaiian governing entity established under

> > the current federal

> > recognition legislation would be forced to seek

> > federal appropriations on

> > a continual basis.

> >

> > Kamehameha was founded by Princess Bernice Pauahi

> > Bishop to foster

> > industrious Native Hawaiian men and women. There's

> > nothing industrious

> > about begging for federal funds for a Native

> > Hawaiian nation for the rest

> > of eternity.

> >

> >

> > Randall Kekoa Quinones Akee

> > Kamehameha Schools Alumni Class of 1990

> >

> >

> > ***************************************

> > Randall K. Q. Akee Doctoral Candidate

> > Political Economy and Government

> > Harvard University

> > akee@fas.harvard.edu

> > ***************************************

>

> Aloha nou,

> Mahalo for post. I will send to whatever base I have.

> Randall is tuned but there is some slack key in his

> observation. If I may, Social Security is not

> Security.

> All entitlements are legislation of the federal trough

> whose benefit is controlled by the pen handlers. If

> one is runt in the herd or one is not in the federal

> pen one does not eat much or anything.

>

> The problem with all of us is we are afraid of missing

> a meal or going without for a time because we have

> indoctrinated to think you can only exist in their pig

> pen. Queen Lili'oukalanai said, I rather eat pohaku

> (stones)than be hand fed by foreign control.

>

> A sovereign Nation of Hawaii can only exist by Treaty.

> No Treaty, a'ole sovereignty. The kanaka maoli will

> become what the Incas and Aztec nations have become,

> extinct. Anything less than a Treaty doctrine is

> serfdome for some and slavery for most. The "some"

> deny it now while the "most" are already there.

>

> Hawaiians should wonder why the (5) Family of Nations

> in 1841 wanted this nation of heathens to become part

> of their Christian Family. No gold, no oil. What was

> it that Great Britain, France, Prussia, Switzerland

> and the new kid, the United States of America wanted?

>

> The first people came here from afar. Is there some

> kind of secret passage or vortex?,or is just Hawaiians

> do not deserve such a paradise and the Pacific pear,

> as Minister Stevens "officially" claimed, is ready for

> plucking. I'd like to drop the "pl" and add you know

> what but we don't have to say it, we know it.

>

> Mahalo Randall. May Iesu Kristo keep you trucking.

> Aloha ke Akua,

> Pilipo Souza

>

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